“Touching” on The Slow Art Movement

“Touching” on The Slow Art Movement

March 30, 2017

As people begin to gear up (or down!) for Slow Art Day on April 8th, alongside 170+ venues that are participating this year, we’re feeling inspired by this BBC Culture video, and want to share what the slow art movement means to the art community.

Watch the BBC video, "How to look at a work of art," discussing the slow art movement: here 

Watch the BBC video "How to look at a work of art"

Watch the BBC video "How to look at a work of art"

So, is there a ‘right’ amount of time to look at, or engage with an art work?

This concept of “eyeball etiquette” can be difficult to feel certain of when looking at an art piece. How long should you look for? What more do you get out of an piece of art if you look at it more slowly?

When you look at art there is a moment where you and the artwork meet in the centre – this can be done if you look at it slowly and fully engage with the piece. Connecting with art in this way has a simple effect: it encourages creativity and helps people discover the joy of looking at art, creating more art lovers.

One hour is needed to experience a masterpiece, says the gallery owner in the BBC Culture video. It is important to think about why the artist created the piece you are observing. How did they go about painting it? What was the inspiration behind it? What is the first thing you noticed about this piece? Thinking about these ideas will allow you to connect with the painting more, and experience the art in the way an artist would have. Of course, the amount of time to look at an art work and what you need to think about can be a varying opinion; after all, everyone has a different way of thinking about art.

Slow Art Day encourages people to choose a few pieces of art and stare at them longer. In most galleries and museums today there are so many different pieces to see. People are racing around and trying to see as much as possible, taking photos instead of really looking. And these photos don’t allow you to fully experience the original work, the way it was intended.

"Please touch the artwork"

"Please touch the artwork"

At Verus Art we take the slow art movement concept even further. With our elevated prints of works by great masters such as Van Gogh and Monet, we encourage people to not only look at our prints, but also to touch them! We enable a more enriched art experience by allowing people to connect with the actual brushwork of their favorite artists – experiencing art the way the artist originally intended. “Please touch the artwork” is at the very core of our philosophy.

Verus Art makes some of the greatest art more accessible so that people can connect with art, the way the slow art movement intends. So have fun slowing down and really looking at art, and why not help other enjoy this experience by joining the movement on social media: #slowartday @SlowArtDay




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